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Course Descriptions

Graduation Requirements

Grades 9-12

4 credits

English

Students whose first language is not English are obligated to earn a minimum of 3 credits in English. International students whose first language is not English must complete English I or higher to graduate.
NOTE: All Montverde Academy students are required to take a minimum of one English class each year.

3 credits

Mathematics

Minimal 3-credit requirement: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II
NOTE: All Upper School students are required to take a minimum of one Math class each year.

3 credits

Social Studies

Required courses: U.S. History (1 credit), Government (½ credit)

3 credits

Science

Required course: Biology (1 credit)

3 credits

World Language

Students whose first language is not English are not required to fulfill this requirement; Students may also satisfy this credit by taking two years of two languages.

1 credit

Fine Arts

Two half-credit courses must be taken in at least two of the following areas: (1) Art (2) Music (3) Theater or a student can opt to take 1½ credits in just one area.

1 credit

Technology

A one credit computer course or two half-credit computer courses must be taken. Students may also earn technology credits by taking two Media Arts courses.

2 credits

Physical Education

Required course: Health; P.E. credits are earned for Afternoon Activities or for participating in a team sport (1/2 credit)

4 credits

Electives

Montverde Academy students must earn a minimum of 24 academic credits and satisfy the subject area requirements as specified above. Once a student enrolls at Montverde, all credits must be earned at the Academy. In addition, students must fulfill the community service requirement and the senior speech requirement as specified by the Dean of the Upper School..

 

Technology

Digital Media CommunicationsTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students will be introduced to various ways to communicate through the use of traditional media and digital technology. Video production, broadcast and print journalism, social media, and online communication techniques will be introduced. Different ways to tell stories through word and picture will also be overviewed and explored.

Radio BroadcastingTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
The Radio Broadcasting course will introduce students to radio broadcast production and sports commentating. Practical, hands-on experience will be gained through Montverde Academy’s AM campus radio station (MVAM 1630). An overview of industry techniques and standards will help engage students to gain an understanding of professional application. Announcements, cultural and school activities, and music production will be explored and used as a basis for show creation and audio production.

TV ProductionTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
(Note: This course requires attendance to campus events occurring at hours outside of the normally scheduled school day.) Students will apply and practice the responsibilities and techniques of television production in remote locations during various MVA cultural, sporting, and institutional events. Students will be responsible for performing all aspects of the production process as this course will prepare them to serve as TV producers, directors, managers, reporters, and camera operators while they function as members of a working media crew. Students will work in teams to capture events.
Corequisite coursework: TV Remote Production.

TV Remote ProductionTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
(Note: This course will be taken outside of the school day and in conjunction with the TV Production course.) Students will learn, apply, and practice the skills and techniques necessary to produce “live” MVA sporting and cultural events. The students will be responsible for all aspects of the production process as this course will prepare them to function as TV producers, directors, production managers, announcers, and camera operators while they function as members of a working media crew. Many of the events produced by this class will be broadcast via the Internet.
Corequisite coursework: TV Production.

TV Studio BroadcastingTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students will learn the theory, techniques, and practice of television studio production while gaining basic skills necessary to function as a team in the media production industry. Instruction in the proper use of equipment and various job responsibilities involved in both traditional studio production and remote location work will be introduced. The activities and processes involved in each phase of production will be presented and reinforced with hands-on participation, assigned production projects, and engaging student activities. With these skills the students will produce the weekly news program MVA Today.

VideojournalismTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students will be introduced to the theory, techniques, and practice of videojournalism. As student video journalists, storytelling and communication will be the focus. Also covered are the basic skills necessary to function as digital, mass media journalists; including ethics and news judgment, types of news stories, news writing, editing news packages, conducting interviews, photo journalism, and internet video distribution. The Videojournalism course addresses skills and qualities required in the industry, but also incorporates classroom-appropriate standards and practices.

Microsoft OfficeTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students of this course will learn the purpose and uses of office/business applications, with a focus on the applications of the Microsoft Office Suite including Windows 8/10, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Topics addressed will include basic word processing and advanced editing skills, creating lists and outlines, font and text formatting, paragraph and page formatting, working with graphics, exploration of spread sheets, organization of data, formula manipulation, presentation development, advanced visual elements, and animation.

Introduction to ProgrammingTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
This introductory course explores the modern super power that is computer programming; taking control of a computer and having it do your bidding. Technical topics such as computer history, number systems, memory management; user interaction; conditional operations; program iteration and procedural management are explored is a manner that is approachable and shows the power of programming as a problem solving skill. Project centric, topics will be explored through the development of information systems, graphic design and games.

Web DesignTechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
This is an introductory course in navigating and designing websites for the World Wide Web. Students will learn how the Internet functions, related terminology, discern well-designed websites from those that are not and to create web pages with HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and Adobe Dreamweaver. By the end of the semester students will be able to create a functioning multi-page website utilizing elements and features like hyperlinks, CSS and embedded media using recognized industry-standard software.

Programming ITechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students build off of the basics delving into technical topics including the Java programming language, program organization, arrays, algorithmic problem solving, and file access; with the goal being improved problem solving skills and preparation for AP Computer Science. Project centric, topics will be explored through a wide variety of platforms allowing graphic design, game analysis and mobile applications development.

Programming IITechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students continue to build their programming and problem solving skills. Taking advantage of its traditionally smaller class sizes, the Programming II and Programming III courses allow students to focus on improving skills in areas of interest to the student. Technical topics covered will include, variable type casting, string operations, user interaction, conditional operations, looping, procedural management, micro controller development, and 2D and 3D modeling.
Prerequisite coursework: Programming I.

Programming IIITechnology: ½ credit, one semester.
Students continue to build their programming and problem solving skills. Taking advantage of its traditionally smaller class sizes, the Programming II and Programming III courses allow students to focus on improving skills in areas of interest to the student. Technical topics covered will include, variable type casting, string operations, user interaction, conditional operations, looping, procedural management, micro controller development, and 2D and 3D modeling.
Prerequisite coursework: Programming II.

AP Computer Science PrinciplesTechnology: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
This new AP course introduces the basics of programming and then uses programming as a languages to focus on the fundamentals of computing, including problem-solving, large-scale data analysis, the Internet, and cybersecurity.
Prerequisite coursework: None.

AP Computer Science ATechnology: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
The AP Computer Science course covers a wide range of themes beginning with the basics of programming and continuing through such topics as algorithmic analysis, advanced graphics and animation. Upon successful completion of APCS students will be able to flex the super power of programming to master any project their interests draw them towards.
Prerequisite coursework: Programming I or equivalent experience. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 109 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1090. ACT (Composite) score of 23.

Advanced GraphicsTechnology: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points.
This course addresses advanced topics in computer science in a venue that is entertaining and informative. A wide range of topics will be explored including image manipulation, exception handing, stacks and queues, recursion and fractals, game theory and user interaction, network communication and mobile applications.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Computer Science A (score of 3 or higher) and teacher recommendation.

Fine Arts

Concert ChoirFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Concert choir is a basic choir class that teaches the fundamentals of singing including vocal technique, sight singing, basic music theory, harmonization, breath control, posture, articulation and ear training. Students do not need prior singing experience for this class although it is helpful. Concert choir produces at least one show each semester. Students must purchase concert choir attire.

Select ChoirFine Arts (Music): 1 credit, one year. Course may be repeated for credit.
Select choir is open by audition only. Students must have prior singing experience, preferably at least one semester of concert choir. Select choir continues the development of singing techniques started in concert choir with an emphasis on 4 part harmony and a cappella singing. Students will develop strong ensemble skills as well as solo skills. Select choir produces at least one show each semester at Montverde Academy and performs for community functions outside of the Academy throughout the year. The select choir will participate in the Lake County solo and ensemble contests in the second semester and the choral MPA. All students must purchase performance attire.
Prerequisite coursework: Departmental approval based on student audition.

Beginning StringsFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
This class offers students the opportunity to learn and perform on a String Orchestra Instrument. These instruments include; Violin, Viola, Cello, and String Bass. Students may rent an instrument and materials from the Academy for a fee based on availability. Students are encouraged to speak with the teacher about signing up for Intermediate Strings after a semester of this class.

Intermediate StringsFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Intermediate Strings is a performance-based class for students who wish to continue increasing their skills on violin, viola, cello, or double bass. Students will learn advanced string techniques, improve their music reading skills, develop practice skills, study music theory, and learn challenging music. Students may rent an instrument and materials from the Academy for a fee, based on availability. The class will perform at least two times throughout the semester. Students new to Montverde Academy must obtain permission from the instructor before signing up for this class.
Prerequisite coursework: Beginning Strings or equivalent experience.

Advanced OrchestraFine Arts (Music): 1 credit, one year. Course may be repeated for credit.
This performance based class is for students who wish to continue increasing their skills on String instruments (Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass). Students will learn advanced technique and practice music that will challenge them. This class will perform at least one concert per semester, as well as perform on Lessons & Carols in the Fall Semester and Graduation in the Spring Semester. Students may rent an instrument and materials from the Academy for a fee based on availability. Students new to Montverde Academy should get permission from the teacher before signing up for this class.
Prerequisite coursework: Departmental approval based on student audition.

Piano Theory IFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester.
Piano/Theory I is an introductory class for students who wish to learn to play the piano and read music. Students will develop basic piano skills including playing scales and arpeggios, note reading, rhythm, music terminology, and listening skills. Students will be able to play simple songs with melody and harmony using both hands by the end of the semester. This class is appropriate for students who have no prior musical training. This class is recommended for anyone who would like to eventually take AP Music Theory.

Piano Theory IIFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester.
Piano/Theory II is an extension of Piano I. It reviews music theory learned in Piano I, then builds upon those skills. Students will develop basic piano skills including playing scales and arpeggios, note reading, rhythm, music terminology, and listening skills. Students will play progressively more advanced piano music. Students will continue to learn sight reading, aural dictation, intervals, key signatures and basic composition and arranging.
Prerequisite coursework: Piano Theory I.

Piano Theory IIIFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester.
Piano/Theory III is an intermediate level class for students who wish to further develop their piano technique and reading skills. Students will work more independently on intermediate level repertoire and complete theory lessons and assignments. This class is recommended for anyone who would like to eventually take AP Music Theory.
Prerequisite coursework: Piano Theory II.

Piano Theory IVFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester.
Students will work independently on advanced piano repertoire, theory and harmonization skills. They will also have the opportunity to learn some pedagogical skills and assist in the lower piano classes.
Prerequisite coursework: Piano Theory III.

Advanced Piano TheoryFine Arts (Music): ½ credit, one semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
This class is specifically for advanced piano players who have a high level of playing skill and a high degree of music theory knowledge. Students in this course will develop important solo performance skills and techniques. Students in this course will also complete piano pedagogy training which will prepare them to become private piano teachers. This class is recommended for students who are in or have completed AP Music Theory.
Prerequisite coursework: Piano Theory IV.

AP Music TheoryFine Arts (Music): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
This class presents students with the five musical elements of theory: melody, harmony, rhythm, texture and style. Prior piano, instrumental or choral music experience is mandatory. This is a college level class and students will take the AP test at the end of the year. This class is intended for students who wish to be serious musical hobbyists after high school or who plan on a career in music.
Prerequisite coursework: Piano Theory I. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Mathematics + Writing) score of 101 and/or SAT (Mathematics + Writing) score of 1010. ACT (Composite) score of 22. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

LessonsFine Arts (Music): 1/3 credit, one semester Course may be repeated for credit.
Students enrolled will gain a deeper understanding and proficiency of their instrument (including voice). Students will work closely with the instructor in order to most efficiently and effectively learn specific musical techniques. Students will perform in a jury at the end of each semester during exam week to demonstrate growth and knowledge of their instrument and performance techniques.
Corequisite coursework: Membership in the Music Conservatory.

Integrated Music SeminarFine Arts (Music): 1 credit, one year. Course may be repeated for credit.
Conservatory students meet 5 days a week to interact and learn in Seminar classes. These classes cover a wide array of instruction on music fundamentals and performance practices. The Seminar schedule will be set weekly by the Conservatory faculty and will remain flexible, focusing on what is important for the student’s musical growth at different points in the year.
Corequisite coursework: Membership in the Music Conservatory.

Acting IFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course is an introduction to the practical skills necessary to the art of acting, including character development, script analysis, acting methods and styles, and performances of monologues and scenes.

Acting IIFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course develops intermediate skills necessary to the art of acting, including character development, script analysis, acting methods and styles, and performances of monologues and scenes.
Prerequisite coursework: Acting I.

Acting IIIFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course develops intermediate and advanced skills necessary to the art of acting, including character development, script analysis, acting methods and styles, and performances of monologues and scenes.
Prerequisite coursework: Acting II.

Acting IVFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course develops advanced skills necessary to the art of acting, including character development, script analysis, acting methods and styles, and performances of monologues and scenes.
Prerequisite coursework: Acting III.

Children’s Theater IFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course is a study of the principles, procedures, and practices of playwriting, acting, directing, and design as it applies to theater for young audiences.

Children’s Theater IIFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course is a study of the principles, procedures, and practices of playwriting, acting, directing, and design as it applies to theater for young audiences.
Prerequisite coursework: Children’s Theater.

Children’s Theater IIIFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course is a study of the principles, procedures, and practices of playwriting, acting, directing, and design as it applies to theater for young audiences.
Prerequisite coursework: Children’s Theater II.

Theater HistoryFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course examines the history and aesthetics of the theatre, including the development of staging, production, and acting methods and styles. Students will study representative plays, documentaries, and essays about theatre from the major periods of dramatic literature, with particular reference to historical context and dramatic convention.

Improvisational ActingFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
Improvisation (improv) is the art of spontaneous acting; Improvisational Acting is a course founded upon performance exercises. These exercises stimulate creative expression and encourage spontaneity. Without a set script, this course is unique among all other performance classes and allows the chance for students to explore the theatre arts with greater creative freedom and enthusiasm.

DirectingFine Arts (Theater): ½ credit, one semester.
This course is a highly self-motivated, hands-on course which teaches both the theory and the practice of directing plays. The class deals with the director and his collaborators from the playwright to the technical designers to the performers, covering selecting and analyzing the script, establishing the play’s essential elements, preproduction, collaboration, casting, scheduling, and blocking.

Introduction to ArtFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This course introduces students to a variety of media and techniques in art making. Students are exposed to methods of two dimensional, three dimensional, photography, and crafts during the semester. Students develop an understanding of the fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a basic understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics, and historical context for each medium explored. This course is designed to expose and familiarize students to the various content areas offered by the art department before electing a semester course in a particular area of art making. This course is highly recommended for students who have not taken art classes previously and for students in need of an art course to fulfill the fine arts graduation requirement.

2-Dimensional ArtFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
Two-dimensional art focuses on forms of visual expression made on flat surfaces. Drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, and digital art are explored during the course. Projects range from working from observation to unique forms of individual expression. Students learn the language and fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a strong understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics and the historical context for each medium explored. Historical and contemporary artists and ideas are examined through readings, lectures, discussions, demonstrations, critiques, and assigned projects. Students learn how to discuss their art and the art of others in formal critiques and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in art making.

3-Dimensional ArtFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
Three-dimensional art focuses on forms of visual expression that have height, width, time, and depth. Relief, subtractive, and additive techniques are explored during the course. Students will experiment working with paper/cardboard, clay, plaster, wire, papier-mâché, and found objects to create three-dimensional sculptures. Also included will be explorations in video and performance. Projects range from working from observation to unique forms of individual expression. Students learn the language and fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a strong understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics and the historical context for each medium explored. Historical and contemporary artists and ideas are examined through readings, lectures, discussions, demonstrations, critiques, and assigned projects. Students learn how to discuss their art and the art of others in formal critiques and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in art making.

CeramicsFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This is an introductory ceramics course. Students are taught the pinch method and coil method of hand building for working with clay. The students may have the opportunity to use a potter’s wheel.

CraftsFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This is an introductory Crafts class. You will be learning to embroider and macrame. The crafts are subject to change.

Photography IFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This course provides an introduction to traditional black-and white film photography. Students learn to operate a 35mm Single Lens Reflex camera, how to process film and make silver gelatin prints in the darkroom. Students learn the language and fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a strong understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics and the historical context of photography. Historic and contemporary ideas about photography as a medium are explored in readings, lectures, demonstrations, critiques and assigned projects. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in photography. Enrollment limit: 10

Photography IIFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This course provides intermediate work in traditional black-and white film photography. Students learn to operate a 35mm Single Lens Reflex camera, how to process film and make silver gelatin prints in the darkroom. Students learn the language and fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a strong understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics and the historical context of photography. Historic and contemporary ideas about photography as a medium are explored in readings, lectures, demonstrations, critiques and assigned projects. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in photography. Enrollment limit: 10
Prerequisite coursework: Photography I.

Photography IIIFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester.
This course provides advanced work in traditional black-and white film photography. Students learn to operate a 35mm Single Lens Reflex camera, how to process film and make silver gelatin prints in the darkroom. Students learn the language and fundamental elements and principles of design. By the end of the course students have a strong understanding of technique, vocabulary, composition, craftsmanship, aesthetics and the historical context of photography. Historic and contemporary ideas about photography as a medium are explored in readings, lectures, demonstrations, critiques and assigned projects. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in photography. Enrollment limit: 10
Prerequisite coursework: Photography II.

Studio ArtFine Arts (Visual): ½ credit, one semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
This is an advanced course that provides an opportunity for highly motivated students to continue exploration of an art discipline(s) they have previously studied. The student decides what content area to investigate and the student and instructor collaborate in the learning process. Students will explore a variety of mediums in their respective content areas and will assemble their work into a portfolio. Congruent to a deeper exploration of the chosen discipline will be readings, research, writing assignments, discussions and critiques. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in art making as well as developing an individual artistic voice. Students considering AP Studio Art are required to take this course.
Prerequisite coursework: Teacher recommendation.

AP Art HistoryFine Arts (Visual): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
This course provides an introductory survey of the art and architecture of the ancient Near East and of Europe from the Prehistoric era through the Gothic period first semester. Second semester places emphasis on the art and architecture of Europe and North America from the Renaissance through the Postmodern era. Throughout the year we will also explore non-western cultures and traditions from Africa, Oceana, Islam, Hinduism, China, Korea and Japan. From the cave paintings of Lascaux to Stonehenge, from the Acropolis to the Holy Roman Empire, from the Egyptian Pyramids to Notre Dame Cathedral, from Michelangelo to Rembrandt, from Monet to Dali, from Picasso to Judy Chicago, humanity’s visual past is explored. This course provides an introduction to methods of viewing, understanding, and discussing art within a historical and cultural context. Students learn to identify and analyze works of art for each period through careful study of art images, reading, lecture, discussion, and writing.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 99 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 990. ACT (Composite) score of 21. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP Studio ArtFine Arts (Visual): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
Advanced Placement courses are for the serious and advanced art student. The AP courses engage students at the same level as introductory college studio art courses. Students who submit a portfolio to the College Board Organization and receive a high score may request credit from the college or university they will attend. Students enrolled in AP studio courses will be expected to produce approximately 40 works exploring a variety of techniques, media and subject matter. Students must meet the standardized requirements of the College Board Organization in order to submit a portfolio, but will receive a separate course evaluation for completion of the class. Satisfactory completion of advanced level art classes and teacher recommendation are required to enroll in AP studio courses. Transfer students must submit a portfolio of work to be approved by the instructor for admission into the course. Students are expected to complete works of art through the summer.
Prerequisite coursework: Introduction to Art and either 2-Dimensional Art or 3-Dimensional Art. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP Studio Art 2-D DesignFine Arts (Visual): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
Advanced Placement courses are for the serious and advanced art student. The AP courses engage students at the same level as introductory college studio art courses. Students who submit a portfolio to the College Board Organization and receive a high score may request credit from the college or university they will attend. Students enrolled in AP studio courses will be expected to produce approximately 40 works exploring a variety of techniques, media and subject matter. Students must meet the standardized requirements of the College Board Organization in order to submit a portfolio, but will receive a separate course evaluation for completion of the class. Satisfactory completion of advanced level art classes and teacher recommendation are required to enroll in AP studio courses. Transfer students must submit a portfolio of work to be approved by the instructor for admission into the course. Students are expected to complete works of art through the summer.
Prerequisite coursework: Introduction to Art and 2-Dimensional Art . Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP Studio Art 3-D DesignFine Arts (Visual): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
Advanced Placement courses are for the serious and advanced art student. The AP courses engage students at the same level as introductory college studio art courses. Students who submit a portfolio to the College Board Organization and receive a high score may request credit from the college or university they will attend. Students enrolled in AP studio courses will be expected to produce approximately 40 works exploring a variety of techniques, media and subject matter. Students must meet the standardized requirements of the College Board Organization in order to submit a portfolio, but will receive a separate course evaluation for completion of the class. Satisfactory completion of advanced level art classes and teacher recommendation are required to enroll in AP studio courses. Transfer students must submit a portfolio of work to be approved by the instructor for admission into the course. Students are expected to complete works of art through the summer.
Prerequisite coursework: Introduction to Art and 3-Dimensional Art. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP Studio Art DrawingFine Arts (Visual): 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
Advanced Placement courses are for the serious and advanced art student. The AP courses engage students at the same level as introductory college studio art courses. Students who submit a portfolio to the College Board Organization and receive a high score may request credit from the college or university they will attend. Students enrolled in AP studio courses will be expected to produce approximately 40 works exploring a variety of techniques, media and subject matter. Students must meet the standardized requirements of the College Board Organization in order to submit a portfolio, but will receive a separate course evaluation for completion of the class. Satisfactory completion of advanced level art classes and teacher recommendation are required to enroll in AP studio courses. Transfer students must submit a portfolio of work to be approved by the instructor for admission into the course. Students are expected to complete works of art through the summer.
Prerequisite coursework: Introduction to Art and 2-Dimensional Art. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

Social Studies

EconomicsSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This semester course offers a study and analysis of economic concepts which allow the student to understand international and national issues and events. The goal of the course is to attain a level of understanding sufficient for understanding of economic issues. Topics will include supply and demand, inflation, unemployment, banking and the Federal Reserve System, public policy, and international trade. This course is offered both semesters.

FinanceElective: ½ credit, one semester.
This course will analyze the principles of finance and will utilize mathematical skills of exponential factoring. The “time value of money” will be introduced and explained as it relates to cost-benefit analysis, a concept that businesses value in forecasting and planning. Analysis of the stock market and market terminology will be explained and enhanced with appropriate problems that deal with everyday situations, such as buying on margin, selling short, volume purchasing, etc.

MarketingElective: ½ credit, one semester.
This is a semester course that focuses on the overall marketing system from the marketing decision-maker’s viewpoint. The course emphasizes product, price, promotion, and distribution as well as planning, research, and organization required to implement marketing concepts. Student will also study the managerial, economic, social, and legal implications of marketing activities, policies, and strategies.

AccountingElective: ½ credit, one semester.
This is a one semester introductory course in double entry accounting procedures. Students will learn to keep financial records for a service or retail business. Principles covered include the accounting cycle, debit/credit theory, financial statements, use of various journal and ledgers, worksheets, accounts receivable and payable, and payroll systems.

AP MacroeconomicsSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
AP Macroeconomics (1 credit) This course deals with the macroeconomic theory of national income with an emphasis on macroeconomic instabilities – inflation and unemployment – and public policy initiated by Congress and the Federal Reserve System. International trade and finance are major topics of study. The short-term goals of the course are to aid the student in understanding those concepts tested in the Macroeconomics AP Exam and to award high school credit in macroeconomics. The long-term goal is to develop student understanding of economic concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, and trade-offs and this understanding will provide a basis for future decision-making
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 111 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1110. ACT (Composite) score of 24. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP MicroeconomicsSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
AP Microeconomics (1 credit) The purpose of the AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system . It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy .
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 106 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1060. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

Ancient World HistorySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a lecture/discussion-based survey course designed for freshmen, exploring Western and non-Western societies from the earliest civilizations to the European Renaissance. The course dissects the development of these societies within the framework of their internal workings, as well as their interaction with and influence on other societies. The course will examine each civilization’s political, social, and cultural legacy.

Ancient World History-HonorsSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a lecture/discussion-based course designed for freshmen, exploring different societies from the early civilizations of Mesopotamia to around the 1300s CE. The course examines both the domestic and international dynamics that gave rise to these civilizations as well as their legacies
Prerequisite coursework: Teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 80 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 800. ACT (Composite) score of 17. Stanford 10 National NCE (Complete Battery) 65.

US HistorySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
U.S. History explores pre-exploration of the Americas to the present with emphasis on the political, social, and economic problems that have changed the nation. Topics of inquiry include the expanding role of the federal government and the federal courts; the continuing tension between the individual and the state and minority rights and majority power; the emergence of a modern corporate economy; the impact of technology on American society and culture; the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a world power.
Prerequisite coursework: SLATE score of 4.0 or higher for students whose first language is not English. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

US History-HonorsSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
United States History (Honors) will be taught as a college level course and is designed to prepare students for and complement the course, Advanced Placement United States History (Reconstruction to the 1990s).
Prerequisite coursework: B- or better in previous history classes; SLATE score of 4.0 or higher for students whose first language is not English. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 129 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1290. ACT (Composite) score of 18. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP European HistorySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This elective course for students seeking potential college credit will examine the major events in Europe’s long modern history, beginning with the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with the Cold War and the fall of the Eastern Bloc. The course will examine the political, economic, and social ramifications of these events, with the support of primary and secondary documents.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 144 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1440. ACT (Composite) score of 21. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP U.S. HistorySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The job of this AP class is to separate fact from myth, truth from spin, and come to a greater understanding of that indefinable term – American. The scope of the course is Reconstruction to the 1990s, with rigor rather than structure dictating class dynamics. Additionally, the course prepares students for the AP exam.
Prerequisite coursework: US History (B- or better) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 150 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1500. ACT (Composite) score of 22. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP World HistorySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This elective course for students seeking potential college credit will examine the major world civilizations from antiquity to modern times. The course utilizes five themes through which each civilization is studied. These are: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic Systems; and development and transformation of social structures.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 99 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 990. ACT (Composite) score of 21. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

GovernmentSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This required course, offered each semester, focuses on how America’s bi-cameral system of government was formed, changed and is working for the people of today. Further, this course aims to develop skills and abilities in analyzing and evaluating issues and public policies in American politics. Topics studied include the three branches of government, the Bill of Rights, the voting process, interest groups, political parties, and how American government compares to the rest of the world. This course is intended to stimulate interest in American politics and impart tools that can be of use to all life-long students of politics and citizens.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Government-HonorsSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Government-Honors aims to teach students to apply an understanding of the United States political system to contemporary events and how American government compares to the rest of the world. Students will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system, and our democratic institutions. A few of the topics studied in the course include the three branches of government, the Bill of Rights, the voting process, interest groups, political parties, and civil rights and liberties. Through lectures and discussions, students will understand the changing political culture of American society and its effects on voting patterns, trends, and the processes of government.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 136 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1360. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

American Civil WarSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The American Civil War is a one semester social studies elective. This course focuses on examining the antebellum period, the Civil War, and the reconstruction through a series of lenses including the military, economic, political, and life on the home front. The course will utilize numerous primary sources and biographies to better understand the multiple perspectives of the period. Additionally, this course examines contemporary interpretations and perspectives of the war. We begin by examining the rise of political and economic sectionalism leading to division and ultimately secession. When studying the war, an analysis of strategies, leadership styles, and changes in military practices and technologies will be essential to understanding the course of the war and its conclusion.
Prerequisite coursework: None.

Holocaust StudiesSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Holocaust Studies is a one semester social studies elective. The goals of the course will be to examine the rise of 20th Century Anti-Semitism, Nazi Germany, and Hitler’s attempt at racial purification. These events will be examined utilizing elements of psychology, sociology, ethics, and economics. The course will also examine post WWII events to better understand prejudice and genocide outside of the Holocaust.
Due to the mature subject matter studied, parental permission will be required for enrollment in this course.

Intro to PhilosophySocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Introduction to Philosophy is an exploration of philosophy focusing on the understanding and application of ethical principles as espoused by classic philosophers. Students will practice the critical thinking skills represented by the different approaches to ethical though by writing and discussion on the issues faced by modern society.

PsychologySocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Through the study of psychology, students acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. This will better prepare them to understand their own behavior and the behavior of others. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: major theories and orientations of psychology, psychological methodology, memory and cognition, human growth and development, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological therapies, stress/coping strategies and mental health

Abnormal PsychologySocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Abnormal psychology is the study of abnormal behavior in order to describe, predict, explain, and change abnormal patterns of functioning. Abnormal psychology studies the nature of psychopathology and its causes, and this knowledge is applied in clinical psychology to treating patients with psychological disorders. Students will have the opportunity to study deviance, distress, dysfunction and how these things may lead to abnormal or disordered behaviors. Subjects include, but are not limited to, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, the origins of deviance and how psychologists treat these disorders. The course consists of several types of learning and evaluation including documentaries, case studies, film evaluations, and discussion.

World ReligionsSocial Studies: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
World Religions is an exploration of the nature of religion in general as well as a focus on the major religions of the world. As the religions are investigated the commonalities will be highlighted along with the distinctions of doctrine and practice.

AP Government & Politics: ComparativeSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This elective course for students seeking potential college credit compares the political systems of six countries plus the European Union. The six countries are: Great Britain, Russia, China, Mexico, Iran and Nigeria. The comparison is organized around key concepts such as, the state, regime type, civil society, political parties and elections, social groups, and public policy both domestic and foreign.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 158 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1580. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Government & Politics: United StatesSocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
A.P. American Government and Politics aims to teach students to apply an understanding of our political system to contemporary events. It is about the American Political System, and it will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system, and our democratic institutions. Through lectures, discussions, analyzing maps, graphs, tables and primary sources, students will understand the changing political culture of American society and its effects on voting patterns, trends, and the processes of government.
Prerequisite coursework: US History. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 159 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1590. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Human GeographySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Geography is the study of where things are located on the Earth’s surface and the reasons for the location. Throughout this course, you will consistently answer two questions: where and why. Where are people and activities located across the Earth’s surface? Why are they located in a particular place? The course will emphasize the relevance of geographic concepts to human problems focusing on specific topics including, but not limited to: diffusion, globalization and cultural diversity, human versus physical geography, all while preparing students for the advancement exam.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 146 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1460. ACT (Composite) score of 21. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP PsychologySocial Studies: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 139 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics + Writing) score of 1390. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

English

English IEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English I builds upon the students’ prior knowledge while emphasizing various elements of communication: grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Various genres of literature are read to expose students to the various elements contained in each. Students practice reading beyond the text through annotations, writings, and discussions. Writing emphasizes proficiency in the areas of clarity and mechanics through literary responses, expository essays, and research reports. The writing format used throughout the English department is the MLA format.

English I-HonorsEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English I builds upon the students’ prior knowledge while emphasizing various elements of communication: grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Various genres of literature are read to expose students to the various elements contained in each. Students practice reading beyond the text through annotations, writings, and discussions. Writing emphasizes proficiency in the areas of clarity and mechanics through literary responses, expository essays, and research reports.
Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 80 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 800. ACT (Composite) score of 17. Stanford 10 National NCE (Complete Battery) 65.

English IIEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a course designed to explore the literature of various authors throughout the world through reading and writing. By reading the works of such authors as Shakespeare, McCourt, Sophocles, and many other literary works from around the world, the students receive a global overview of the literature that reveals the cultural differences between people of the world. In addition to their reading of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction, students will also complete in-depth studies of novels such as, Angela’s Ashes, Enrique’s Journey, and The Color of Water. Students will produce analytical essays, critical reviews, and a research paper related to their study of world literature. Vocabulary skills will be developed through reading and writing, as well as the systematic study of Latin, Greek and Anglo-Saxon roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Students will also participate in activities to prepare for the reading portion of the SAT.
Prerequisite coursework: English I. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

English II-HonorsEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a course designed to explore the literature of various authors throughout the world through reading and writing. By reading the works of such authors as Shakespeare, Achebe, McCourt, Sophocles, and many other literary works from around the world, the students receive a global overview of the literature that reveals the cultural differences between people of the world. In addition to their reading of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction, students will also complete in-depth studies of novels such as, Angela’s Ashes, Enrique’s Journey, Invisible Man, Things Fall Apart, and My Forbidden Face. Students will produce analytical essays, critical reviews, and a research paper related to their study of world literature. Vocabulary skills will be developed through reading and writing, as well as the systematic study of Latin, Greek and Anglo-Saxon roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Students will also participate in activities to prepare for the reading portion of the SAT.
Prerequisite coursework: English I or English I-Honors and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 84 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 840. ACT (Composite) score of 18. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

English IIIEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English III is an intellectually demanding, inquiry-driven exploration of American culture and society which prepares students to do college-level work. Students develop reading strategies and critical thinking skills while searching for explanations for the America of today in the literature of the past. Beginning with discussions of the early English colonization of present-day America, the course works chronologically, looking for the common and often competing ideas that have shaped American thought. The course is writing-intensive, with an emphasis on revision as part of the writing process. It also includes a formal study of English grammar, vocabulary practice, and preparation for work in Advanced Placement courses as well as for standardized college admissions tests such as the SAT.
Prerequisite coursework: English II. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

English III-HonorsEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English III Honors is an intellectually demanding, inquiry-driven exploration of American culture and society which prepares students to do college-level work. Students develop reading strategies and critical thinking skills while searching for explanations for the America of today in the literature of the past. Beginning with discussions of the early English colonization of present-day America, the course works chronologically, looking for the common and often competing ideas that have shaped American thought. The course is writing-intensive, with an emphasis on revision as part of the writing process. It also includes a formal study of English grammar, vocabulary practice, and preparation for work in Advanced Placement courses as well as for standardized college admissions tests such as the SAT.
Prerequisite coursework: English II or English II-Honors and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 88 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 880. ACT (Composite) score of 19. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

English IVEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English IV focuses on enabling students to develop college ready reading and writing skills through in-depth analysis of British literary texts. There is a strong focus on acquiring a collegiate level vocabulary and understanding and applying that vocabulary in context, as well as recognizing main idea, inference, purpose, and tone within texts. English IV also concentrates on language study, composition from pre-writing to publication, the study of Standard English conventions, and the study of mentor writing selections to assist in the development of various forms of writing and media publication.
Prerequisite coursework: English III. Limited to students enrolled in grade 12.

English IV-HonorsEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
English IV Honors focuses on enabling students to develop college ready reading and writing skills through in-depth analysis of British literary texts. There is a strong focus on acquiring a collegiate level vocabulary and understanding and applying that vocabulary in context, as well as recognizing inference, purpose, and tone within texts. A substantial amount of outside reading will be required, as will frequent analytical writing. English IV Honors also concentrates on language study, composition from pre-writing to publication, the study of Standard English conventions, and the study of mentor writing selections to assist in the development of various forms of writing and media publication.
Prerequisite coursework: English III, English III-Honors, or AP English Language and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 92 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 920. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grade 12.

AP English Language and CompositionEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
“An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” (The College Board, AP English Course Description, Fall 2010, p. 7) The course is organized around six essential questions—one for each of our thematic units. The course will have its framework in American literature; however, writers from other cultures will also be included as needed and as appropriate. In this class, the development of close reading and writing skills guide the sequencing and choice of materials.
Prerequisite coursework: English II-Honors (or higher) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 94 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 940. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

AP English Literature and CompositionEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Focusing on the close, critical reading of poetry, drama, and fiction, this course is both demanding and intellectually stimulating. The course includes written analysis and in-depth discussion of literature from the 16th Century through the contemporary period. Building upon the eleventh grade development of critical reading and writing skills, the course is parallel to a college-level literature course and prepares students to take the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Examination, which is required upon completion of the course.
Prerequisite coursework: English III-Honors (or higher) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 103 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 1030. ACT (Composite) score of 22. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

JournalismEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Journalism is an intensive writing course with two main aims. One is to produce the school’s newspaper, and the second is to engage students with the realities and necessities of the ethics, principles, requirements, and goals of the modern journalist. The course focuses on journalistic style and types of articles, ranging from the basic news story to the movie review, along with the overall concepts of editorial expression. Students will learn the issues and challenges that accompany the production of a newspaper along with detailed tasks, like typography and layout, which define a successful publication.

Literature IEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a skill building course. Course work centers on vocabulary building and reading skill building. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension while improving in various areas of literature, including critical thinking, social studies and writing. In addition to continuing reading skills, the course also teaches the elements of fiction, biographies, autobiographies and nonfiction.
Corequisite coursework: Composition I.

Composition IEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Fundamentals of writing are stressed, including sentence writing, paragraph writing, and short composition writing. Various types of composition are taught including personal narratives and descriptive, expository, and persuasive essays. Extensive grammar review and mechanics are covered plus basic grammatical structures and formal rules of English grammar appropriate to the students’ academic work. Competencies covered include using verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, articles, prepositions and forming questions.
Corequisite coursework: Literature I.

Grammar IEnglish: ½ credit, one semester.
This course focuses on the introduction of basic grammar concepts such as verb tenses, nouns, pronouns and prepositions. Reading, listening, vocabulary and writing skills are also integrated throughout the semester in order to develop an overall understanding of grammar structures. This course is designed for beginning level English students.
Corequisite coursework: Literature I, Composition I.

Communications IEnglish: ½ credit, one semester.
This course introduces students to the basic level of communication along with listening and speaking development. The goals of this course are to expand vocabulary, improve oral comprehension and provide extensive practice in overall communication.
Corequisite coursework: Literature I, Composition I.

Speech IEnglish: ½ credit, one semester.
The main goal is to develop basic English language communication skills through interactive listening and speaking activities. It is designed for the beginning English learner. Exercises focus on vocabulary, pronunciation, and speaking skills.
Corequisite coursework: Literature I, Composition I.

Literature IIEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The main goal is to develop the student’s ability to comprehend written English through practice with a variety of reading materials. Comprehension instruction includes pre- and post-reading activities, vocabulary development, use of graphic organizers, and essay writing
Corequisite coursework: Composition II.

Composition IIEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Fundamentals of writing are stressed to include grammar skills, essay writing, and short story and research projects. Writing as a process is emphasized as well as use of technology for research purposes and writing. Writing prompts comparable to what is found on standardized college admissions tests are introduced. It focuses on high-intermediate grammatical structures and formal rules of English grammar appropriate to academic work. Competencies covered include using verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, articles, prepositions, clauses, prepositional phrases and forming questions among others.
Corequisite coursework: Literature II.

Speech IIEnglish: ½ credit, one semester.
The primary objective of this course is to enhance the student’s ability to speak and understand English. Students will participate in a variety of pair, group, and individual speaking and listening exercises. The course is intended for high-beginning to high-intermediate learners of English.
Prerequisite coursework: SLATE Test score of 2.0 or higher. Corequisite coursework: Literature II, Composition II.

History IIElective: ½ credit, one semester.
This course teaches the history of the United States from 1492 till present time. During the first semester, the focus will be on the time before the Civil War. The second semester will focus on the time after the Civil War. In both courses the emphasize will be on target vocabulary, note-taking skills with the use of iPads and graphic organizers, and writing skills. This course has three main objectives: 1) Continue the development of students’ reading and writing skills, and 2) teach the vocabulary of social studies and prepare foreign students for the more rigorous History Department course, and 3) teach research methods.
Corequisite coursework: Literature II, Composition II.

Integrated Science IIElective: ½ credit, one semester.
The first semester will focus on earth and physical science and the second semester on the study of biology. It emphasize target vocabulary, note- taking skills with the use of iPads and graphic organizers, various science activities and writing skills. This course has three main objectives: 1) Continue the development of students’ reading and writing skills, and 2) teach the vocabulary of life, earth and physical science and prepare foreign students for more advanced classes, and 3) teach research methods.
Corequisite coursework: Literature II, Composition II.

Literature IIIEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Students will improve their English reading, writing, speaking and listening capabilities through the study of literature and literary elements. The primary goal of this course is to introduce and implement reading strategies, so that students are better equipped to summarize, discuss, analyze, compare and contrast, synthesize, and evaluate literature. Students will come away from this course with a better understanding of how to approach literature and reading in general, so that they are able to be successful in other English classes.
Prerequisite coursework: SLATE score of 3.0-3.4. Corequisite coursework: Composition III.

Composition IIIEnglish: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The emphasis of this course is to build upon the grammar concepts and practical uses learned in previous courses and apply them to various writing styles – narrative, informative, persuasive and research papers. Furthermore, students will build vocabulary awareness and strategies for implementing new words into their daily lives.
Prerequisite coursework: SLATE score of 3.0-3.4. Corequisite coursework: Literature III.

History IIIElective: ½ credit, one semester.
This course models the U.S. History course, but takes into consideration the different backgrounds of international students. The course is a broad study of significant events during the course of American history, exploring political, social, and economic developments that shaped and impacted our country.
Corequisite coursework: Literature III, Composition III.

Creative WritingEnglish: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This writing-intensive course focuses on the development of critical reading and writing skills.

Foreign Language

Spanish IForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is an introductory course for students beginning the study of the Spanish language. This course will teach the necessary skills to begin communicating and writing in Spanish. Essential vocabulary and grammar skills are presented through the exclusive use of the target language. Students will role-play, practice listening skills, and learn to perform a variety of language functions such as speaking, listening, writing, questioning, describing, and expressing opinions in Spanish. Students will read short stories to work on the integration of language skills through reading, writing, and class discussions. Students in this course will advance to Spanish II.

Spanish IIForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is a continuing study of the Spanish language with students working toward proficiency utilizing their foundation from the first-year level. More verb tenses, grammatical structures, and a greater base of vocabulary are introduced. Students will work on the integration of language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of this course students will have read a novel completely in Spanish to apply all the skills learned in levels I and II. Students in this course advance to Spanish III.
Prerequisite coursework: Spanish I.

Spanish IIIForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Spanish III continues to build on skills learned in levels I and II. Previously learned grammar from the beginning levels is reviewed and intermediate level grammar is introduced. Students learn more advanced and specific vocabulary terminology and are expected to demonstrate their language skills through presentational and interpersonal speaking assignments. During the second semester there is a focus on interpretive communication (reading & listening) skills as the course becomes more content based. Students learn Spanish through the study of Mexico and Mesoamerican cultures, a Spanish language video series, and reading of a short novel in Spanish. Through this content, students are exposed to whole language that allows them to integrate skills learned in the areas of grammar, reading, writing, speaking and listening. Successful completion of this course will qualify students to advance to Spanish IV.
Prerequisite coursework: Spanish II.

Spanish IVForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Spanish IV is a Spanish language and culture course intended for students who wish to continue their Spanish language study beyond level III. The course is culture based with an exploration of Spanish speaking countries and regions around the world beginning with Spain, the countries of South America, Central America and the Caribbean. Students will learn geography and read about the history and culture of each country and/or region. At the end of each cultural unit, students will view films or documentaries to further explore the socio-economic, political and historical circumstances of Spain and Latin America. There is a complete review of Spanish grammar as well as advanced grammar instruction to improve presentational and interpersonal communication skills. This course is recommended for those who wish to advance to AP Spanish Language & Culture or university level Spanish courses after graduation from Montverde Academy.
Prerequisite coursework: Spanish III.

AP Spanish Language and CultureForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The AP Spanish Language course seeks to develop proficiency and a strong command of Spanish language and culture by focusing the development and integration of language skills using authentic sources and content such as Spanish language newspapers, radio broadcasts, video clips, interviews, literary works and internet sources. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish and requires students to demonstrate communicative competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. Students will engage in a variety of activities including a complete review of Spanish grammar, development and refinement of formal writing skills, formal and informal speaking skills, and interpretation of written and aural sources to improve reading and listening comprehension. Central to the course are overarching course themes that integrate language, content, and culture into interrelated lessons and activities that promote use of the language in a variety of contexts. All students who take this course are required to take the AP Spanish Language & Culture exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Spanish IV or teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 75 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 750. ACT (Composite) score of 17. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

Chinese IForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is an introductory course for students beginning the study of the Chinese language and culture. This course teaches the skills necessary to begin communicating and writing in Chinese. Essential characters, vocabulary and sentence structures are presented through handwriting practice, game playing and singing. Culture unit and film watching will enhance Chinese culture awareness and language learning. Students will role-play situations, practice listening skills, and learn to perform a variety of language functions: to listen, to ask questions, to describe, to express opinions. Students in this course advance to Chinese II.

Chinese IIForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Chinese II continues to emphasize the four skills of speaking, writing, listening and reading. Students will expand their vocabulary and develop oral proficiency and writing skills through oral practice, class presentations, discussions, characters and essay writing, films, language lab, and culture and history. The students are highly motivated and understand the value of world languages in the global community.
Prerequisite coursework: Chinese I.

Chinese IIIForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This class is an advanced level Chinese course designed for the student who has mastered the fundamentals of the Chinese language and is now ready to apply his/her ability in a wide variety of topics. This course will emphasize in strengthening Chinese listening, writing, reading and conversational skills as well as introducing Chinese history and literary works. Reading selections from famous Chinese poetry, novels, and drama will be included to give the student a deeper insight into Chinese culture and history. Through readings, students are exposed to Chinese traditional and contemporary artists, literature, history, current events and philosophy.
Prerequisite coursework: Chinese II.

Chinese IVForeign Language: 1 credit, one year.
This course provides students with the opportunity to continue developing their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Chinese IV is an extension of Chinese III, focusing on complex Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Oral proficiency is assessed regularly. Chinese IV serves as preparation for students planning to continue their study of Chinese language and literature. Instruction in Chinese IV is primarily, if not exclusively, in Mandarin Chinese.
Prerequisite coursework: Chinese III.

AP Chinese Language and CultureForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This college-level elective course is designed for well-qualified students who wish to prepare for the Advanced Placement Chinese Language and Culture Exam. All the components of this exam are analyzed and practiced, with an emphasis placed on mastering advanced skills in oral communication, listening comprehension, grammar structures, fiction and non-fiction reading comprehension, and essay writing. The culture and history of Chinese and the Chinese speaking communities will be explored through art, music and films. Students will use various media sources to obtain information that they will use for periodic oral presentations to the class. Students must take the AP Exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Chinese IV or teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 75 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Writing) score of 750. ACT (Composite) score of 17. Limited to students enrolled in grades 11 and 12.

French IForeign Language: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is an introductory course for students beginning the study of the French language. This course will teach the necessary skills to begin communicating and writing in French. Essential vocabulary and grammar skills are presented through the exclusive use of the target language. Students will role-play, practice listening skills, and learn to perform a variety of language functions such as speaking, listening, writing, questioning, describing, and expressing opinions in French. Students will read short stories to work on the integration of language skills through reading, writing, and class discussions.

Physical Education

HealthPhysical Education: ½ credit, one semester.
Health is a combination of the physical, mental/emotional and social well being of the student. Personal responsibility is stressed as a primary means of promoting health. Topics include physical fitness and nutrition, mental and emotional health, stress management, safety and injury prevention, substance abuse, human biological systems, diseases/disorders, and personal development.

Mathematics

Algebra IMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to provide a solid foundation in Algebra for those students in a college preparatory curriculum. The course emphasizes analytical skills and problem solving techniques. Throughout the course, previously developed methods are extended and enlarged to cope with more abstract situations so the student can follow a logical solution path based on well-known steps.

GeometryMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is developed as a postulational system of reasoning. Students practice the use of postulates, definitions and theorems in deductive formal and informal proofs involving arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric settings.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra I (C- or better).

Geometry-HonorsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is designed to develop the geometric relationship and deductive strategies that can be used to solve a variety of real world mathematical problems with more emphasis on proofs.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra I-Honors (B- or better) or Algebra I (A- or better) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 84 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 840. ACT (Composite) score of 18.

Algebra IIMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is the 2nd year of algebra in preparation for college mathematics. The course continues the study of the structure of algebra and provides the foundation for applying these skills to other mathematical and scientific fields.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra I (score of C- or better) and Geometry.

Algebra II-HonorsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course presents an in-depth study of the topics of Algebra II with an emphasis on theory, proof, and the development of formulas, as well as their application.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra I and Geometry (B- or better) and teacher recommendation.

Liberal Arts MathMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a full year course that provides a common sense approach to mathematical topics that are useful in our contemporary world. Principles covered include problem solving, logical analysis, number representation and calculation, algebraic equations and inequalities, personal finance, probability theory and statistics, and voting and apportionment method.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra II.

Advanced Algebra & TrigonometryMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to enhance and continue the study of mathematics after Algebra I, II, and Geometry and provide a college level foundation to students not aspiring to a math, science, or technical major.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II.

PrecalculusMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to extend the analysis of functions, logarithmic, trigonometric functions, to develop concepts and skills in advanced algebra, and analytic geometry. Data analysis, matrices, and parametric equations will also be studied. This class is a requirement for students wishing to take the AP Calculus AB class or Applied Calculus.
Prerequisite coursework: Geometry and Algebra II (C- or better).

Precalculus-HonorsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to extend the analysis of functions, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Data analysis, matrices, and parametric equations will also be studied. This Honors-level class will be faster paced and go into much greater depth. This class is a requirement for students wishing to take the AP Calculus AB course.
Prerequisite coursework: Geometry-Honors and Algebra II-Honors (B- or better). Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Mathematics) score of 46 and/or SAT (Mathematics) score of 460. ACT (Composite) score of 19.

StatisticsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is developed to be a thorough introduction to statistics. The students will learn to use statistical methods to collect, analyze, and draw conclusions (interpret) from real-life, and/or presented data. Use technology (computers and graphing calculators) to present and interpret the data and write reports over their finding. (This is a Pre-AP Statistics course.)
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra II (C- or better).

AP StatisticsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose for this AP course in Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns 2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study 3. Anticipating patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation 4. Statistical inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses Students will be required to take the AP exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Calculus AB or Statistics (B- or better) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 107 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1070. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Applied CalculusMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is designed for students who are college-bound and plan to study business, economics, management, or the sciences. The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop knowledge and skills in Calculus concepts while strengthening and extending concepts learned in previous mathematics courses. The content includes functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, applications of differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration, applications of integration, trigonometric functions, series and sequences.
Prerequisite coursework: Precalculus (C- or better).

Calculus-HonorsMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and provide experience with its methods and applications. The course will emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations are also important.
Prerequisite coursework: Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry or Precalculus (B- or better). Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Mathematics) score of 48 and/or SAT (Mathematics) score of 480. ACT (Composite) score of 20.

AP Calculus ABMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and provide experience with its methods and applications. The course will emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations are also important. Students will be required to take the AP exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Precalculus (A- or better), Applied Calculus (B- or better), or Calculus-Honors (B- or better) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Mathematics) score of 54 and/or SAT (Mathematics) score of 540. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Calculus BCMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The purpose of this course is to advance the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus that would be equitable to what a college student would learn in the first semester of a college-level calculus course. Students will be required to take the AP exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Precalculus or AP Calculus AB (B- or higher) and teacher recommendation. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Mathematics) score of 57 and/or SAT (Mathematics) score of 570. ACT (Composite) score of 25. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Multi-Variable CalculusMathematics: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points.
The purpose of this course is to develop students’ understanding of the concepts of multivariable calculus and provide experience with its methods and applications. The course will emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations are also important.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Calculus BC (B- or better).

Science

BiologyScience: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Biology is a required high school course that provides the foundation for high school anatomy/physiology and college freshmen biology. Topics include general scientific principles, cell biology, biochemistry, evolutionary biology, genetics, biological diversity, ecology, microbiology, botany, invertebrate zoology and vertebrate zoology. Students will learn to design and conduct their own investigations and to interpret and communicate scientific principles. Supporting course work includes laboratory exercises, cooperative group learning, projects, reports, presentations and analysis of current events in the field of science. Internet research, computer simulations, probe ware and pod casts will be utilized during this course.

Biology-HonorsScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Honors Biology is an advanced science course that prepares students to take other advanced science courses such as AP Chemistry and AP Biology. Because Honors Biology is an advanced class, the course depth and pace will be greater than the general biology course. Students interested in taking the AP Biology course should enroll in Honors Biology. Much like the general course, students in Honors Biology will learn to design and conduct their own investigations and interpret their results. Students in Honors Biology will participate in laboratory exercises and investigations, cooperative learning, projects, and presentations. Topics include biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, microbiology, evolution, diversity, animal physiology, and ecology.
Prerequisite coursework: B- or better in previous science course. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 89 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 890. ACT (Composite) score of 18. Stanford 10 National NCE (Complete Battery)

EcologyScience: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. This course provides a background in the fundamental principles of ecological science, including concepts of natural selection, population and community ecology, biodiversity, and sustainability. The course will also explore some of today’s major ecological challenges, and the important research that is being done to address these concerns.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Environmental ScienceScience: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Environmental science is the study of the impact of humans on the environment. The course is a combination of some important and basic concepts of earth science, ecology and biology. The long-term educational goal of this course is to help students to grow their interest and academic strength in the subject, and also prepare them as careful and responsible citizens for environmental protection.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Forensic ScienceScience: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Forensic Science is a 1-semester science course designed to introduce the concepts and skills related to crime scene investigation and forensics. This course utilizes lectures, laboratory exercises, case studies, and web-based activities to model how science is used to solve problems and answer questions. Topics of study will include the history of forensic science, crime scene and physical evidence processing, fingerprinting, autopsies, drugs and toxicology, serology and DNA evidence, ballistics analysis, digital forensics, and careers in forensics.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Intro to EngineeringScience: ½ credit, one semester.
Introduction to engineering is a STEM oriented, project based introductory course dealing with the profession and techniques of engineering. Areas of concentration will include history of engineering, engineering disciplines, technical communication, materials, problem solving, designing and modeling, and teamwork. Supporting course work will include: projects, book work, videos, and possible field trips.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Marine BiologyScience: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This is a semester long class that is a survey of the organisms of the marine environment. The class begins with a review of evolutionary biology. Organisms from the microscopic to the largest animals are studied while maintaining the perspective of the interrelatedness of all creatures and the ecosystem of the earth. The different marine zones and habitats are also studied with the organisms that inhabit each.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Physical ScienceScience: ½ credit, one semester. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Physical science is an introductory science course dealing with how nature and matter work. Areas of concentration will include motion, forces, fluids, work, energy, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. This class requires some command of math, mostly basic algebra. Supporting course work will include: demonstrations, laboratory experiments, projects, reports, and analysis of current events in the field of science, especially physics.
Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

ChemistryScience: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Chemistry is a general college-preparatory course. Success in this course should adequately prepare the student for general chemistry in college. Topics include the metric system and scientific measurements, general scientific principles, the atomic theory, structure of the atom, atomic bonding, reactions and equations, solutions, moles and stoichiometry, the periodic table, and descriptive chemistry. Supporting course work includes extensive demonstrations and laboratory exercises, projects/reports, scientific journal article summaries, and analysis of current events in the field of science. This is an elective science course, but it is highly recommended for those students seeking college admission.
Prerequisite coursework: Biology. Corequisite coursework: Algebra II. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Chemistry-HonorsScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Honors Chemistry is a general college-preparatory course. The Honors section of Chemistry covers more topics in more depth, and is thus more quickly-paced. Success in this course should adequately prepare the student for general chemistry in college. Topics include the metric system and scientific measurements, general scientific principles, the atomic theory, structure of the atom, energy, atomic bonding, reactions and equations, solutions, colligative properties, nuclear chemistry, the periodic table, and descriptive chemistry. Supporting course work includes extensive demonstrations and laboratory exercises, projects/reports, scientific journal article summaries, and analysis of current events in the field of science. This is an elective science course, but it is highly recommended for those students seeking college admission.
Corequisite coursework: Algebra II. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 95 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 950. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Physics-HonorsScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.4 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Physics honors is an introductory college-prep science course dealing with how nature and matter work. Areas of concentration will include matter, heat, electricity, light, sound, and many others. This class requires a good command of math, especially algebra and beginning trigonometry. Supporting course work will include: demonstrations, laboratory experiments, projects, reports, and analysis of current events in the fields of science, especially physics.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra II. Corequisite coursework: Precalculus or Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 93 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 930. ACT (Composite) score of 20. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

Anatomy & Phys.Science: 1 credit, one year. Approved NCAA Core Course.
Human Anatomy and Physiology is a yearlong course providing a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body; biochemical composition; and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Students will learn through class discussion and lecture, laboratory work (including dissections),cooperative group learning, projects/reports, analysis of current events in the field of science, use of multimedia, and internet research.
Corequisite coursework: Biology.

AP BiologyScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. AP Biology includes a range and depth of topics, and laboratory requirement well beyond what would be expected in a high school biology classroom. Students in AP Biology cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations which comprise at least 25% of the instructional time. Topics in AP Biology include: evolution, cellular processes, genetics, biological systems, and ecology. Upon demonstrating proficiency on the AP Biology exam, students majoring in biology in college may be allowed to enroll in upper-level courses for which biology is a prerequisite, or may have completed the life science requirement for college if they choose not to major in biology. Students in this course are required to take the AP Biology Exam in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Biology (B- or better) and Chemistry (B- or better). Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 109 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1090. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP ChemistryScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. The course has a wide range of topics that will be explored rigorously and in depth. Topics include atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Students will also participate in laboratory work to acquire skills in making observations of chemical reactions and substances, recording data, calculating and interpreting results, and communicating effectively the results of experimental work. Students in this course are required to take the AP examination in May.
Prerequisite coursework: Algebra II (B- or better) and either Chemistry (A- or better) or Chemistry-Honors (B- or better). Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 111 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1110. ACT (Composite) score of 24. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Environmental ScienceScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Unlike most other introductory-level college science courses, environmental science is offered from a wide variety of departments, including geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography. Depending on the department offering the course, different emphases are placed on various topics. Some courses are rigorous science courses that stress scientific principles and analysis and that often include a laboratory component; other courses emphasize the study of environmental issues from a sociological or political perspective rather than a scientific one. This AP Environmental Science course has been developed to be most like the former; as such, it is intended to enable students to undertake, as first-year college students, a more advanced study of topics in environmental science or, alternatively, to fulfill a basic requirement for a laboratory science and thus free time for taking other courses.

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study.

Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 106 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1060. ACT (Composite) score of 23. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Physics 1Science: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
Advanced Placement Physics 1 is an algebra-based course in general physics which covers guidelines set by the College Board and also mirrors an introductory level university physics course. The AP Physics 1 course is arranged around six big ideas that bring together the fundamental science theories and principles of general physics. These ideas are intended to inspire students to think about physics concepts as interlocking steps of a bigger whole notion. The completed notion is how the real world around them works. The students will be participating in guided and inquiry-based labs to obtain a more conceptual understanding of these physics topics. Students will spend less of their time in traditional formula-based learning and more of their effort will be directed to developing critical thinking and reasoning skills.
Prerequisite coursework: Precalculus or Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry; Physics. Corequisite coursework: Calculus. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 111 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1110. ACT (Composite) score of 24. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Physics 2Science: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points.
The AP Physics 2 course is arranged around six big ideas that bring together the fundamental science theories and principles of general physics. These ideas are intended to inspire students to think about physics concepts as interlocking steps of a bigger whole notion. The completed notion is how the real world around them works. The students will be participating in guided and inquiry-based labs to obtain a more conceptual understanding of these physics topics. Students will spend less of their time in traditional formula-based learning and more of their effort will be directed to developing critical thinking and reasoning skills.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Physics 1. Corequisite coursework: Calculus. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12. Advanced Placement Physics 2 is an algebra-based course in general physics which covers guidelines set by the College Board and also mirrors an introductory level university physics course.

AP Physics C: Elec. & Mag.Science: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is equivalent to a first year college physics class and follows the syllabus for that examination. The course requires and employs a basic understanding of calculus (differentiation and integration) and requires a prior course of physics.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Calculus AB; Physics, AP Physics 1, or AP Physics 2. Corequisite coursework: AP Calculus BC. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 116 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1160. ACT (Composite) score of 24. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.

AP Physics C: MechanicsScience: 1 credit, one year. Weighted +0.8 quality points. Approved NCAA Core Course.
This course is equivalent to a first year college physics class and follows the syllabus for that examination. The course requires and employs a basic understanding of calculus (differentiation and integration) and requires a prior course of physics. Ideally, a prerequisite course of calculus should also have been completed.
Prerequisite coursework: AP Calculus AB; Physics, AP Physics 1, or AP Physics 2. Corequisite coursework: AP Calculus BC. Recommended standardized test scores include one or more of the following. PSAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 112 and/or SAT (Critical Reading + Mathematics) score of 1120. ACT (Composite) score of 24. Limited to students enrolled in grades 10, 11, and 12.